Associate Editors


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Associate Editors



Helen C. Bostock (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), Auckland, New Zealand) is a marine geologist, who focuses her research on the Quaternary paleoceanography of the SW Pacific and Southern Ocean, specifically working on changes in ocean circulation, ocean acidification, sedimentary processes, foraminifera and productivity.
Website: https://www.niwa.co.nz/people/helen-bostock


Gabriel J. Bowen (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, US) is focusing his research on the use of large geochemical datasets to understand coupling of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes with climate change today and over multiple timescales throughout the Cenozoic.
Website: http://wateriso.utah.edu/spatial/index.html


Min-Te Chen (National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan, ROC) has expertise in using multiple proxy records of microfossil, biogenic and terrestrial components, isotopic, inorganic and organic chemical records from marine sediments to better understand the mechanisms responsible for driving Quaternary oceanic climate changes in the Indo-Pacific Ocean.
Website: http://www.iag.ntou.edu.tw/files/90-1029-53.php?Lang=en


Nathalie Goodkin (Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technical University, Singapore) is a paleoceanographer focused on high temporal resolution records of climate, ocean circulation, and marine chemistry including the carbon cycle and trace metals, using coral geochemistry and working with general circulation models.
Website: http://www.earthobservatory.sg/research-group/marine-geochemistry-nathalie-goodkin


Guy Harrington (Petrostrat, UK, and University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK) is a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institution and has previously worked with the British Geological Survey. His research focus is palynology and paleoenvironments of the Cenozoic, and the particularly Paleogene.
Website: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/gees/harrington-guy.aspx


Sandra Kirtland Turner (University of California, Riverside, CA, USA) is focused on applying a coupled data-model approach to quantitatively reconstruct carbon cycle and climate processes on a warm Earth, particularly in response to episodes of rapid climate change. She specializes in the generation of high-resolution geochemical records from ocean sediment cores and focuses on interpreting these records through the development and application of Earth system models that can simulate physical and biogeochemical process in the atmosphere, oceans, and deep-sea sediments over a variety of timescales.
Website: http://earthscience.ucr.edu/Sandy_turner.html


Zhifei Liu (State Key Laboratory of Marine Geology, Tongji University, Shanghai, China) is a marine sedimentologist with research interests in deep-sea sedimentary dynamic processes and land-sea interaction on various time scales, including in-situ submarine mooring observations on present-day processes, Quaternary glacial-interglacial variations, and geological evolution since early Cenozoic. He focuses on proxies of detrital sediments mainly using clay and bulk mineralogy, grain size, major and trace elements, and neodymium and strontium isotope geochemistry.
Website: http://mgg.tongji.edu.cn/space/zhifei/


Christopher J. Poulsen (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) is a climatologist with expertise in earth system modeling, paleoclimatology and paleoceanography, and water isotopes. He has published on topics including extreme greenhouse and icehouse climates, mountain-uplift induced climate change, ice-age cycles, and plant physiological forcing of past and future climate.
Website: http://www.umclimate.com/chris-poulsen.html


Christopher Reinhard (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA) is centering his research on understanding the chemical evolution of Earth's oceans and atmosphere on a range of timescales, and leveraging that understanding to piece together a broad understanding of the factors controlling the emergence and maintenance of planetary biosignatures.
Website: http://reinhard.gatech.edu/


Jim Russell (Brown University, Providence, RI, USA) uses organic and inorganic geochemical records derived from lake sediments to better understand the mechanisms driving changes in terrestrial climate during the Quaternary. He specializes in the generation and interpretation of records of rainfall and temperature from tropical Africa and Asia.
Website: https://vivo.brown.edu/display/jarussel


Joellen L. Russell (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA) uses climate and earth system models to examine the role of the ocean, particularly the Southern Ocean, in global climate and the global carbon cycle in the past, present and future.
Website: http://www.geo.arizona.edu/Russell


Daniela N. Schmidt (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK) focuses her research on understanding the causes and effects of environmental changes on marine biota. She is recognised as an expert in the biotic reactions of marine calcifiers to climate change, and enjoys using and testing tools from a wide range of fields including isotope geochemistry, material testing, tomography to climate modelling.
Website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/earthsciences/people/daniela-n-schmidt/research.html


Elisabeth L. Sikes (Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA) has research interests which include assessing changes in the ocean's circulation and estimating sea surface and ocean temperatures primarily through the use of biomarkers, carbon isotopes, and oxygen isotopes as geochemical proxies. Current directions concentrate on climate-related changes in the carbon cycle in the Late Quaternary with a focus on the Southern Ocean's influence on ocean-atmosphere CO2 partitioning.
Website: https://marine.rutgers.edu/~sikes/


Ryuji Tada (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) has research interests which include understanding the structure of the Earth’s climate system and its evolution through Earth history. He is also interested in exploring how the earth system responds to perturbations and how it has recovered. One example of such an exploration is the evolution and variability of the Asian Monsoon and its role in Earth’s climate system.
Website: http://www.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/people/tada_ryuji/