Browse Journal Highlights

Highlights include enriched and related content of notable journal articles presented on Eos org AGU org AGU On Demand and in AGU journals

Scientists capture Earth’s “hum” on ocean floor

Joseph Cariz

Blog— Scientists have long known earthquakes can cause the Earth to vibrate for extended periods of time. However, in 1998 a research team found the Earth also constantly generates a low-frequency vibrational signal in the absence of earthquakes. Since then, seismologists have proposed different theories.... more

RESEARCH BOLSTERS POSSIBILITY OF PLATE TECTONICS ON EUROPA

Press Release— SUBDUCTION—THE SLIDING OF ONE TECTONIC PLATE BENEATH ANOTHER--IS POSSIBLE ON THE ICE SHELL OF JUPITER'S MOON EUROPA, A NEW STUDY SHOWS. THE PROCESS COULD SUPPLY CHEMICAL FOOD FOR LIFE TO A SUBSURFACE OCEAN. WASHINGTON D.C. — A recent study provides new evidence that the icy shell of.... more

Reducing Errors in Satellite-Derived Arctic Sea Ice Thicknesses

Sarah Witman, Freelance Writer

Research Spotlight— Salty snow throws off satellite-based estimates of Arctic sea ice thickness by up to 25%. A new method seeks to fix that. Each September, Arctic sea ice melts to a minimum point and then refreezes again over the winter. As a result of climate change, the Arctic is warming at a rate.... more

Where Did the Water Go on Mars?

Andrew Yau, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters

Editors' Highlight— Primordial solar storm conditions are believed to have significantly enhanced the loss of water and other atmospheric volatiles in Mars’ history. Liquid water used to exist on the Mars surface long ago, but no longer does today. The question is how Mars lost its atmosphere of water.... more

Moon’s Crust Underwent Resurfacing after Forming from Magma Ocean

Blog— The Earth’s Moon had a rough start in life. Formed from a chunk of the Earth that was lopped off during a planetary collision, it spent its early years covered by a roiling global ocean of molten magma before cooling and forming the serene surface we know today. A research team led by The University.... more

Sloping Topography and Oceanic Surface Modes

Andrew M. Hogg, Editor, Geophysical Research Letters

Editor’s Highlight—  An accurate understanding of the influence of ocean bottom topography helps to diagnose the velocities of subsurface currents.  Currents in the ocean are continually changing, influenced by factors such as “eddies,” circular movements of water, and “planetary waves,” large-scales.... more

Mapping a Valparaíso Earthquake from Foreshock to Aftershock

Sarah Witman, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights— Using seismic data recorded along the Chilean coast, scientists retrace the development of a recent earthquake.  A massive arc of seismic activity—stretching from Australia to Japan, up toward Alaska, and down along the west coast of the Americas—is known among geologists.... more

Angles of Plasma Ropes near Mars Point to Different Origins

Sarah Stanley, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights— Variation in the orientation of flux rope features in Mars’s magnetotail suggests that some of them form on the planet’s Sun-facing side and travel to the night side. In its infancy, Mars may have generated a strong magnetic field, much like Earth’s. Today, all that.... more

Scientists locate whistling space electrons’ origins

Blog— Scientists have long known that solar-energized particles trapped around the planet are sometimes scattered into Earth’s upper atmosphere where they can contribute to beautiful auroral displays. Yet for decades, no one has known exactly what is responsible for hurling these energetic electrons.... more

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Featured Special Collection

A Census of Atmospheric Variability from Seconds to Decades 

The atmosphere varies naturally on all length scales from millimeters to thousands of kilometers, and on all time scales from seconds to decades and longer.  This special collection of Geophysical Research Letters synthesizes and summarizes that variability through a phenomenological census.  The collection brings together some of the most influential and definitive papers to have been published in this journal in recent years.  The topics covered include turbulence on time scales of seconds and minutes, gravity waves on time scales of hours, weather systems on time scales of days, atmospheric blocking on time scales of weeks, the Madden–Julian Oscillation on time scales of months, the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation and El Niño–Southern Oscillation on time scales of years, and the North Atlantic, Arctic, Antarctic, Pacific Decadal, and Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillations on time scales of decades.  The collection is accompanied by a Commentary article, which provides an authoritative, concise, and accessible point of reference for the most important modes of atmospheric variability.

A Census of Atmospheric Variability from Seconds to Decades