Browse Journal Highlights

Highlights include enriched and related content of notable journal articles presented on Eos org AGU org AGU On Demand and in AGU journals

What Led to the Largest Known Volcanic Eruption in Human History?

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights— A mineral-dating project at the Toba caldera in Inonesia sheds light on the science of supereruptions. In the northern part of the Indonesian island of Sumatra lies the Toba caldera, a massive crater formed by the largest known volcanic eruption ever experienced by.... more

Explaining Why Some Paleomagnetic Results Fail

Terri Cook, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights—Reordering of mineral crystal lattice structures during laboratory heating may explain the frequent need to reject results of experiments that estimate the intensity of Earth’s past magnetic fields. The basic idea behind the field of paleomagnetism is that certain iron-bearing.... more

Exploring Ancient Ocean Acidification in the Rock Record

Alexandra Branscombe, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights—Scientists studying Earth’s ancient oceans use a new method to measure ocean acidification and its effect on extinction events. Earth’s history is dotted with major mass extinction events from various natural disasters, including climate change. Fossil evidence shows.... more

Alteration Along the Alpine Fault Helps Build Seismic Strain

Terri Cook, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights—Detailed analysis of cores drilled through New Zealand’s most dangerous on-land fault indicates that its permeability and strength are altered by mineral precipitation between seismic events. In New Zealand, the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates is.... more

Tracking Volcanic Bombs in Three Dimensions

Leah Crane, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights—A new method allows researchers to precisely track in three dimensions bits of fragmented magma as they are expelled in explosive volcanic eruptions.  In explosive volcanic eruptions, bits of fragmented magma can be shot through the air by the release and expansion.... more

Fingerprinting the Source of Fore-Arc Fluids

Terri Cook, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights—A new model tracks boron and other tracers in fluids expelled from subducting slabs to help identify the fluids’ source regions and migration routes. Where one of Earth’s tectonic plates overrides another at a subduction zone, compaction and dehydration of sediments.... more

Deep Drilling Reveals Puzzling History of Campi Fegrei Caldera

Alexandra Branscombe, Freelance Writer

From Eos.org: Research Spotlights— Results show that caldera collapse attributed to a super eruption almost 40,000 years ago was smaller than what scientists expected. So what might have really happened? At least  10% of the global population lives within 100 kilometers of a historically active volcano..... more