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Mars Aeronomy

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Last updated:
3 November 2017
The Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and solar-wind interactions are becoming increasingly important for understanding loss of atmosphere to space and the evolution of the Martian climate.  Recent observations have been made from Mars Express over the last decade, from MAVEN for the most-recent Mars year, and from Mars Odyssey, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the Mars Orbiter Mission; landed spacecraft and earlier orbiters also provided valuable information. The International conference on Mars Aeronomy held in May 2017 in Boulder, Co, USA brought together all aspects of Mars aeronomy, including pertinent observations, analyses, theoretical models and results. The proposed special issue will collect the papers presented at the conference as well as will be open to all relevant manuscripts about the Mars upper atmosphere and space environment, even if the authors did not attend the conference. This collection is a joint special section between JGR-Space Physics and JGR-Planets, so the authors can submit manuscripts to either journal.

Observations, Simulations and Theory of Electric Currents in the Solar System

Andreas Keiling, UC Berkeley

Octav Marghitu, Institute for Space Sciences, Bucharest

Michael Wheatland, University of Sydney
Electric currents are fundamental to the structure and dynamics of space plasmas. New developments in observations, simulations and theory made it timely to collect new research studies on electric currents. Hence, this special issue of JGR-Space Physics contains research papers on electric currents in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of the Earth and other planets, in the heliosphere, and on the Sun. Studies contained adress not only current system structure and dynamics but also the impacts and ramifications on the local space environment. Many of the collected papers are based on presentations and discussions at an AGU Chapman conference held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in May 2016. Papers relevant to the scope but not presented at the conference are also included.

Editors’ Highlights from Cassini Mission

Last updated:
15 September 2017

NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

After two decades of incredible exploration, the Cassini Mission to Saturn finished on September 15, 2017. The Cassini spacecraft has beamed back images and vast amounts of data, first from its flybys of Earth, Venus and Jupiter, then from 13 years spent circulating the ringed planet and its moons, as well as insights from landing the Huygens probe on the surface of Titan, the largest moon. According to NASA, 3948 science papers have been published as a result of the mission. A search for papers in AGU journals with Cassini mentioned in the abstract published since the mission started in 1997 generated more than 750 results across 6 different journals. We are very proud that AGU has played a significant role in publishing some of the important findings from the mission. We invited some of the editors to reflect on papers published in their journals and how they have contributed to our scientific understanding. Read their comments here; the papers they chose to highlight are included in this collection.

The Arctic: An AGU Joint Special Collection

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Last updated:
24 August 2017
The Arctic has become the focus of many new investigations and studies across a number of disciplines. In many cases, this research is integrating diverse new data sets, observations, and modeling, and making connections among and across the biosphere, oceans, atmospheres, space, and geophysical environments. These papers include historical and new research on the Arctic and represent the following AGU journals: Earth’s Future, Earth and Space Science, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems (G-Cubed), Geophysical Research Letters, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, JAMES (Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems), JGR: Oceans, JGR: Atmospheres, JGR: Solid Earth, JGR: Space Physics, JGR: Biogeosciences, JGR: Earth’s Surface, Reviews of Geophysics, Space Weather, and Water Resources Research.

Dayside Magnetosphere Interactions

This special collection addresses the processes by which solar wind mass, momentum, and energy enter the magnetosphere. Regions of interest include the foreshock, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and cusps, the dayside magnetosphere, and both the dayside polar and equatorial ionosphere. Results from spacecraft observations (e.g., MMS, Cluster, Geotail, THEMIS, and Van Allen Probes), ground-based observations (all-sky camera, radar, and magnetometer), MHD, hybrid and PIC simulations are all included. Parallel processes occur at other planets, and recent results from NASA’s MAVEN mission to Mars, as well as ESA’s Mars and Venus Express missions are also included.