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Atmosphere-ice-ocean-ecosystem processes in a thinner Arctic sea ice regime: the Norwegian young sea ICE cruise 2015 (N-ICE2015)

Results are presented from a 6-month interdisciplinary field experiment (Norwegian young sea ICE cruise; N-ICE2015) conducted in Arctic first-year sea ice north of Svalbard to understand atmosphere-ice-ocean interaction and the response of the physics, biogeochemistry and the marine ecosystem to the new thinner ice regime in the Arctic basin.

The Arctic: An AGU Joint Special Collection

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Last updated:
24 August 2017
The Arctic has become the focus of many new investigations and studies across a number of disciplines. In many cases, this research is integrating diverse new data sets, observations, and modeling, and making connections among and across the biosphere, oceans, atmospheres, space, and geophysical environments. These papers include historical and new research on the Arctic and represent the following AGU journals: Earth’s Future, Earth and Space Science, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems (G-Cubed), Geophysical Research Letters, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, JAMES (Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems), JGR: Oceans, JGR: Atmospheres, JGR: Solid Earth, JGR: Space Physics, JGR: Biogeosciences, JGR: Earth’s Surface, Reviews of Geophysics, Space Weather, and Water Resources Research.

Midlatitude Marine Heatwaves: Forcing and Impacts

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Last updated:
22 August 2017
*This is a Joint Special Collection* 
The following journals are accepting submissions: Geophysical Research Letters, JGR Oceans, JGR Biogeosciences, and JGR Atmospheres.


Persistent, midlatitude marine heatwaves (MHWs), such as the 2013-2014 extreme warming of the Northeastern Pacific (aka “the Blob”), can have dramatic and widespread impacts on ecosystems, fisheries and weather. MHWs have been observed in both hemispheres (e.g., the Ningaloo Niño in Western Australia), including in semi-enclosed basins such as the Mediterranean Sea. MHWs can be caused by a combination of atmospheric and oceanographic processes. It is also expected that they will become more frequent and intense under anthropogenic climate change. This Special Collection welcomes papers investigating the causes, evolution, and impacts of persistent midlatitude MHWs.

Extreme Climate Event Impacts on Aquatic Biogeochemical Cycles and Fluxes

Last updated:
10 March 2017
This special collection brings together manuscripts that evaluate how extreme climate events (ECEs) can influence the fluxes, cycling, and transformations of nutrients and solutes in aquatic ecosystems.  These articles stem from the presentations and discussions that were made at the AGU Chapman Conference on Extreme Climate Event Impacts on Aquatic Biogeochemical Cycles and Fluxes in San Juan, Puerto Rico (Jan 22-27, 2017).
Extreme climate events (ECEs) have increased and are projected to further increase in intensity and frequency across the United States and the world. Such events include tropical storms and hurricanes, thunderstorms, heat waves, droughts, ice storms, snowstorms and/or nor’easters, unexpected frost/freeze events, and tornadoes. These extreme events are expected to have significant consequences for aquatic ecosystems with potential for large changes in ecosystem processes, response, and functions. Such changes could impair the important services that these ecosystems provide and thus affect the well-being of our environment and society.

Midlatitude Marine Heatwaves: Forcing and Impacts

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Last updated:
29 June 2016
Persistent, midlatitude marine heatwaves (MHWs), such as the 2013-2014 extreme warming of the Northeastern Pacific (aka “the Blob”), can have dramatic and widespread impacts on ecosystems, fisheries and weather. MHWs have been observed in both hemispheres (e.g., the Ningaloo Niño in Western Australia), including in semi-enclosed basins such as the Mediterranean Sea. MHWs can be caused by a combination of atmospheric and oceanographic processes. It is also expected that they will become more frequent and intense under anthropogenic climate change. This Special Collection welcomes papers investigating the causes, evolution, and impacts of persistent midlatitude MHWs.

Arctic Freshwater Synthesis

Last updated:
13 June 2016
Increasing scientific knowledge indicates that changes to the Arctic freshwater systems have produced, and could produce even greater, changes to bio-geophysical and socio-economic systems of special importance to northern residents and also produce some extra-arctic effects that will have global consequences.  It is for these reasons that three international organizations, the World Climate Research Program’s Climate and Cryosphere Project (CliC), the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), and the Arctic Council’s Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), jointly called for the undertaking of an Arctic Freshwater Synthesis (AFS).  The AFS focused on assessing the various Arctic freshwater sources, fluxes, storage and effects, and has six major Components: Atmosphere, Oceans, Terrestrial Hydrology, Terrestrial Ecology, Resources and Modelling - each led by two well-renowned international convening authors.  Additional authors were added to the component teams to ensure production of best state-of-the-science review manuscripts.   The journal issue is comprised of these six Component review manuscripts bookended by a context-setting introduction and a final summary manuscript, which identifies key emerging issues.

Midlatitude Marine Heatwaves: Forcing and Impacts

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Last updated:
20 May 2016
Persistent, midlatitude marine heatwaves (MHWs), such as the 2013-2014 extreme warming of the Northeastern Pacific (aka “the Blob”), can have dramatic and widespread impacts on ecosystems, fisheries and weather. MHWs have been observed in both hemispheres (e.g., the Ningaloo Niño in Western Australia), including in semi-enclosed basins such as the Mediterranean Sea. MHWs can be caused by a combination of atmospheric and oceanographic processes. It is also expected that they will become more frequent and intense under anthropogenic climate change. This Special Collection welcomes papers investigating the causes, evolution, and impacts of persistent midlatitude MHWs.

Experiment-Model Integration in Terrestrial Ecosystem Study: Current Practices and Future Challenges

Published:
1 August 2014
Experiment and process modeling are two foundational approaches to scientific inquiry. While data-driven modeling research is currently very active for evaluation and improvement of land process models, experimental scientists and modelers mostly work separately. Experimentalists have often viewed modeling activities as an afterthought of data collection, resulting in experimental data that are not readily assimilated by modeling efforts. Conversely, modeling efforts have not effectively communicated results to the field science community nor helped guide data collection aside from gross identification of areas that are not adequately represented in models. To shift the philosophy and culture of research toward these integrated approaches, we need to explore and develop a variety of strategies to encourage integrated experiment-model research.

Linking Physical, Chemical, and Biological Processes in Watersheds from the Cellular and Grain Scales to the Landscape Scale

Published:
1 September 2013
Linking Physical, Chemical, and Biological Processes in Watersheds from the Cellular and Grain Scales to the Landscape Scale