Initial Results from the NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Balloon Flight Mission

Initial Results from the NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Balloon Flight Mission. Credit: NASA

Published: 1 December 2016

The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) high-altitude balloon mission was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico on 25 September, 2015. Over 20 hours of science data were obtained from four dosimeters at altitudes above 20 km. One of the main goals of the RaD-X mission is to improve aviation radiation models. The high-altitude balloon flight data provide measurements for assessing how well aviation radiation models characterize the source of secondary particles which dominate radiation exposure at commercial flight altitudes. The second goal of the RaD-X mission is to facilitate the pathway toward real-time, data assimilative predictions of aviation radiation exposure by identifying and characterizing low-cost, compact radiation detectors. The RaD-X campaign was also supported by ground-based calibration measurements, radiation dose measurements taken on an ER-2 aircraft flown out of NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, and dosimeter measurements onboard a King Air C90 aircraft operated by the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Fort Sumner. This collection of papers report the dosimeter measurements and initial findings from the RaD-X flight campaign.   
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