Call for Papers for "Concentration-discharge relations in the critical zone”

Submission acceptance begins: 1 February 2016

Proposers:Jon Chorover, Institution: University of Arizona
William McDowell, Institution: University of New Hampshire
Louis Derry, Institution: Cornell University

Manuscripts are invited for a special section of Water Resources Research (WRR) in which Critical Zone scientists seek to develop mechanistic-predictive theory of critical zone structure, function and long-term evolution. Contemporaneous hydrochemical controls over all three can be related quantitatively to dissipative solute releases measured down-gradient of reactive flow paths. These flow paths have variable lengths, compositions, and residence times, and their mixing is reflected in concentration-discharge (C/Q) relations. It is recognized that contemporaneous measurements are only that, and don’t necessarily reflect C/Q behavior over the course of CZ evolution. Motivation for this special section originates from a U.S. Critical Zone Observatories workshop that was held at the University of New Hampshire, July 20-22, 2015. The workshop focused on resolving mechanistic CZ controls over surface water chemical dynamics across the full range of lithogenic (e.g., non-hydrolyzing and hydrolyzing cations and oxyanions) and bioactive solutes (e.g., organic and inorganic forms of C, N, P, S), including dissolved and colloidal species that may co-occur for a given element. Papers are invited to be included in this special section if they utilize information pertaining to internal, integrated catchment function (relations between hydrology, biogeochemistry and landscape structure) to help shed light on controls over observed C/Q relations.

Manuscripts should be submitted through the GEMS Web site.  For additional information please contact wrr@agu.org


Call for Papers for "Engagement, Communication, and Decision-Making Under Uncertainty” or “ECODECUN1”

Submission acceptance begins: 15 January 2016

Proposers:Grey Nearing, Institution: NASA GSFC Hydrological Sciences Laboratory
Mary Hill, Institution: University of Kansas
Anthony Jakeman, Institution: Australian National University
Ming Ye, Institution: Florida State University

Manuscripts are invited for a special section of Water Resources Research highlighting why and in what circumstances uncertainty matters, and how science and research-oriented hydrologists can help identify and provide germane information and support required by decision-makers. Modern hydrologic literature contains a large number of technical approaches to estimating and managing uncertainty, but relatively few insights into how these estimates relate to one another, how they are best used to solve practical problems, and about how the needs of decision making processes can be used to drive the tradeoffs that are inherent in any technical exercise in uncertainty analysis or accounting.

Manuscripts should be submitted through the GEMS Web site.  For additional information please contact wrr@agu.org


Call for Papers for "Modeling highly heterogeneous aquifers: Lessons learned in the last 30 years from the MADE experiments and others"

Submission acceptance begins: 15 November 2015

Proposers:J. Jaime Gómez-Hernández, Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València

Manuscripts are invited for a special section of Water Resources Research dealing with results of tracer experiments performed in highly heterogeneous aquifers, particularly the well-documented experiments performed at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi, USA. These results have challenged the research community for almost three decades, generating extensive debate regarding mechanisms controlling contaminant transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers, modeling strategies for effectively representing these mechanisms, and how to obtain the data required to use those models in a predictive fashion. Recent work at MADE demonstrates its continuing relevance for advancements in aquifer characterization and modeling techniques. The wealth of data obtained over the years at MADE and similar sites has provided a basis to develop and test different conceptualizations and models of solute transport. This special section will focus on the following two questions: What have we learned from field-scale tracer experiments in highly heterogeneous aquifers and where do we go from here? What modeling approaches are most effective for simulating groundwater transport through highly heterogeneous media and quantifying associated uncertainties, and what information is needed to parameterize these models?

Manuscripts should be submitted through the GEMS Web site.  For additional information please contact wrr@agu.org


Call for Papers for “Emergent aquatic carbon-nutrient dynamics as products of hydrological, biogeochemicial, and ecological interactions”

Submission acceptance begins: 15 September 2015

Proposers:Tim Covino, Institution: Colorado State University
Hong-Yi Li, Pacific Northwest National Lab
Heather Golden, US EPA, Office of Research and Development
Jinyun Tang, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Manuscripts are invited for a special section of Water Resources Research dealing with Carbon-nutrient dynamics in aquatic systems, such as rivers, lakes and wetlands, represent emergent responses from complex interactions among hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes. For example, hydrologic flow paths and residence times are connected closely to attendant biogeochemical processing of carbon and nutrients (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorous, sulfur). These, together with other interconnected processes (e.g., human activities, aquatic ecological dynamics), organize biogeochemical patterns across various aquatic systems at a range of spatiotemporal scales. A coherent understanding synthesized from different physical and biological disciplines is therefore necessary to interpret and predict the complex and often non-linear behavior of aquatic systems. In this special issue, we seek contributions that investigate hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological interactions – particularly those involving carbon-nutrient dynamics – and that provide insight to the functioning of these linked systems from interdisciplinary perspectives.

Manuscripts should be submitted through the GEMS Web site.  For additional information please contact wrr@agu.org